What is Remembrance Day?

18-Nov-2010

What is Remembrance Day?

Remembrance Day is a day to remember all those who were killed during the two World Wars and other conflicts. Remembrance Day is also known as Poppy Day, because of wearing an artificial poppy on that day. They are sold by the Royal British Legion, a charity which helps war veterans.

Remembrance Sunday is held on the second Sunday in November, which is usually the Sunday nearest to 11 November. Special services are held at war memorials and churches all over Britain. A national ceremony takes place at the Cenotaph in Whitehall, London. Wreaths are laid beside war memorials. Also, small wooden crosses are left by the memorials in remembrance of a family member who died in war.

But why a poppy?

In Flanders took place one of the bloodiest battles of the First World War. After the battles, in the places of buildings and roads appeared mud and the only surviving thing was a poppy flowering each year. John McCrae from the Canadian Armed Forces was moved by what he saw there. In 1915, in his pocketbook, he scribbled down the poem “In Flanders Fields“. McCrae’s poem was published in ‘Punch‘ magazine under the title ‘In Flanders Fields‘. The poppy became a popular symbol for soldiers who died in battles.

Vocabulary:

Artificial
Poppy
Memorial
Take place
Wreaths
Remembrance
Battle
Appear
Mud
Survive
Pocketbook
Scribble
Publish